Skip to Main Content
It looks like you're using Internet Explorer 11 or older. This website works best with modern browsers such as the latest versions of Chrome, Firefox, Safari, and Edge. If you continue with this browser, you may see unexpected results.

CFS 143 - Children at Risk

Read and Evaluate What You Found

1. Does the journal include peer-reviewed articles?
 Search for your journal title in  Ulrich's International Periodicals Directory to see if it is scholarly/academic and refereed (peer-reviewed).

Now look at the article itself:

2. Is it an empirical article, i.e.,  a report of original research, written by the researcher(s)?
Even if you determined that the journal in which an article was published is scholarly, these journals usually also contain other types of articles such as editorials, commentary, review articles, and news.  
    ♦ Clues you might find in the abstract include words such as:
      study, results, methods/methodology, data, interview, survey, ethnographic, experimental,
      questionnaire, empirical, data, qualitative, quantitative.
     ♦ Look at the format of the article. Does it follow the "typical format"?

3. Consider the Publication Date:
Is the article sufficiently up-to-date for your purpose?

4. Is it Relevant?
Does this information relate to your topic or answer your question?

Reading an empirical article using the typical format of an empirical article as a guide:
1    
    2 
        3  

Title
Author and Institutional Affiliation
Abstrac
t
Introduction
    Literature Review

        Methods
    Findings or Results
Discussion
Conclusions

        References
        Tables
        Figures

How to Read a Scientific Paper

Tutorial from Purdue University Libraries