Skip to Main Content
It looks like you're using Internet Explorer 11 or older. This website works best with modern browsers such as the latest versions of Chrome, Firefox, Safari, and Edge. If you continue with this browser, you may see unexpected results.

History / Jewish Studies 100W Fields

Professor Jill Fields

Finding Books @ the Library


Use OneSearch on the library homepage to search the library's books collection, and to search and request items from other libraries through CSU+. For more information and tips, please visit the library's guide to using OneSearch

Materials at other Libraries

Didn't find an item you were looking for? Chances are we can still get it from another library for free!

The Henry Madden Library offers two options for requesting materials:

CSU+ 

  • Find and request books and media from all 23 CSU libraries. 
  • Materials arrive in 2-4 business days
  • Most books have 60 day lending periods, no renewals. Media items (DVD's, audio CD's, etc.) usually 30 days, no renewals
  • Select the CSU+ Books and Media collection in Onesearch to find and request materials

Interlibrary Loan

  • Request articles and books not in CSU+ (not textbooks) through interlibrary loan
  • Books typically arrive in 7-10 business days, articles in 2-3 business days
  • Loan period for books varies, as is set by lending library. Articles arrive in PDF format and are accessible for 30 days
  • To request an item, log into your interlibrary loan account, and fill out a new request form

Primary Source Books

There are a number of strategies you can use to locate books with primary source material. 

1. Keywords

Certain keywords listed in a book title or subject heading indicate that it contains primary source material.  Look for any of the following words:

  • documents
  • letters
  • speeches
  • papers
  • personal narratives
  • correspondence
  • records
  • diary
  • sources
  • texts
  • journals

In a title:

In a subject heading (located in the item record):

 

 

2. Author

If you are researching a specific person, look for that person's name listed as an author (just below the title).  It may be a book they wrote, such as an autobiography, or a collection of their works, such as speeches or letters.

In Advanced Search, you can also search specifically by author.

3. Date

You sometimes identify primary sources based on the date of publication.  Sources published during the time period you are researching can be primary sources.  Just be aware that primary sources can be published long after the event, so date alone won't always tell you whether a source is primary.

4. Bibliographies / References

Check the bibliography or reference list of secondary sources that you have found, such as books, articles, or even Wikipedia.  These sources will almost always list their sources, and sometimes will even include a separate list of primary sources they consulted.